2017 © Pedro Peláez
 

library authentication

Small but flexible authentication system for micro frameworks

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journey/authentication

Small but flexible authentication system for micro frameworks

  • Monday, July 3, 2017
  • by justin-schroeder
  • Repository
  • 2 Watchers
  • 0 Stars
  • 50 Installations
  • PHP
  • 0 Dependents
  • 0 Suggesters
  • 0 Forks
  • 0 Open issues
  • 1 Versions
  • 4 % Grown

The README.md

Authentication

Build Status, (*1)

Why

Frequently micro frameworks require a small user base, whether for administration settings or restricting access to content, this Authentication class exists to allow micro framework authors to spend no more than a few seconds setting up an authentication system., (*2)

Usage

Installation

To add Authentication to your project, just use composer:, (*3)

composer require journey/authentication dev-master

Configuration

The easiest way to configure the authentication module is in your project's bootstrap file:, (*4)

# bootstrap.php

Journey\Authentication::config([
    'users' => array( ... )         # (required) See details below
]);

In the above example, those configuration options would be set for all instances of Authentication called through the runtime. There are several different configuration options that allow a great level of flexibility and ease of use:, (*5)

Option Default Description
users null Required See the user list configuration options below
salt null A random string your passwords are salted with
hash md5() A Callable that returns a hashed password (by default simply uses md5())
block redirect A Callable responsible for blocking access when called
columns null Column keys to apply to un-keyed data types (currently only csv). While there is technically no default, the system implicitly uses the order: ['username', 'password', 'level']
levels null A numeric index of human readable names to assign your permission levels (something like: ['user', 'editor', 'developer'];)

User List

The configuration option users allows you to provide a list of valid users to authenticate against. All lists require three parameters for each user username, password, and level, where the password is a valid hash. The list can be provided though a number of flexible methods:, (*6)

Array

The simplest method for providing a user list is an explicit array. A sequential array containing arrays of users., (*7)

# bootstrap.php
$users = [
    [
        'username' => 'some-username',                      # a username
        'password' => '5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99',   # md5 hash of of the password
        'level'    => 1                                     # permission level
    ],
    [
        'username' => 'another-user',
        'password' => '48cccca3bab2ad18832233ee8dff1b0b',
        'level'    => 1
    ]
];

Journey\Authentication::config([
    'users' => $users
]);

Comma Separated Values

The user list can be provided as a path to a .csv file., (*8)

# bootstrap.php
$users = 'path/to/users.csv';

Journey\Authentication::config([
    'users' => $users
]);
# users.csv
some-username,5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99,1
another-user,48cccca3bab2ad18832233ee8dff1b0b,1

Note: because csv files lack keys, it is expected they will be in the order username, password, level. If they aren't you may provide a secondary configuration option columns which expects an array containing the three required keys in the the order they are used in the csv., (*9)

Initialization File (.ini)

A user list could also be a simple .ini file., (*10)

# bootstrap.php
$users = 'path/to/users.ini';

Journey\Authentication::config([
    'users' => $users
]);
# users.ini
username[] = some-username
password[] = 5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99
level[]    = 1

username[] = another-user
password[] = 48cccca3bab2ad18832233ee8dff1b0b
level[]    = 1

Database

A PDOStatement may also provide the user list. The statement should represent the entire table of users, and of course, contain the columns username, password, and level., (*11)

# MyLogic.php

use Journey\Authentication;
use PDO;

class MyLogic
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $db = new PDO("sqlite: /path/to/database.db");

        Authentication::config([
            'users' => $db->query('SELECT * FROM users')
        ]);
    }
}

Authenticatable

The most robust option is to provide an object which implements the Authenticatable interface. This delegates control of the user list and user-lookup to your own external class., (*12)

# MyAuthenticator.php

use Journey\Authenticatable;

class MyAuthenticator implements Authenticatable
{
    public function authenticate($username, $password)
    {
        $users = $this->getUsersHoweverIWant();
        foreach ($users as $user) {
            if ($user['username'] == $username && $password == $password) {
                return $user;   # returned user must be an array containing username, password, and level
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
    ...
}
# bootstrap.php

Journey\Authentication::config([
    'users' => new MyAuthenticatable()
]);

Note: When providing an Authenticatable class rather than a user list, the salt and hash configuration properties will not be used. It is up to your class to provide the user list, and validate usernames and passwords against it., (*13)

Authenticating Users

Once your users have been configured, actually authenticating is easy-peasy. There are four frequently used methods authenticate(), restrict(), isAtLeast(), and is(). Before a user's permissions can be checked they must be authenticated or logged in:, (*14)

# login.php
...

use Journey\Authentication;

$auth = new Authentication();
if ($auth->authenticate($_POST['username'], $_POST['password'])) {
    echo "You're logged in!";
} else {
    echo "Woops. Bad username or password";
}

Once a user has been authenticated, a browser session will be set to keep them logged in. On the command line, they will stay authenticated for the remainder of the runtime. After authentication, restricting access only requires a call to restrict()., (*15)

To logout, or unauthenticated use: Authentication::unauthenticate();, (*16)

# sensitive.php

use Journey\Authentication;

class MySensitiveThings
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        Authentication::restrict(1);
    }
}

If the restrict() method fails, they application will die to prevent further execution. The configuration option block (a Callable) will be called before the die() command is issued (by default block contains a redirect to GET /login). To check access without killing the application, use isAtLeast() or is() which only return boolean values., (*17)

Note: All three access control methods also accept a level map string from the configuration file like: Authentication::isAtLeast('editor');, (*18)

The Versions

03/07 2017

dev-master

9999999-dev

Small but flexible authentication system for micro frameworks

  Sources   Download

MIT

The Requires

 

authentication user login